Glenn Jones + Shannon Hayden, SAT 4/7/12

InterCambio presents a night of musical innovation with:

GLENN JONES
The Wanting, Glenn Jones’ first album for Thrill Jockey, was recorded in a fourth floor apartment on Commonwealth Avenue, Allston, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, overlooking the commuter train line. If you listen carefully to the record, you can occasionally hear trains going by in the background. A little background and context may help. So in his own words:

“The ‘60s, as has been drummed into our heads to the point of tediousness, was a period of musical growth and exploration. And while there does seem to have been something in the water back then that everyone of a certain age was sipping, I came of age late in that decade. In 1967, my head was blown off by Jimi Hendrix’s second album. After hearing it, I bugged my old man till he bought me my first guitar. I was 14. Today, I consider myself to be part of a tribe of acoustic finger-style guitar players whose main inspirations are the “American Primitive” or “Takoma school” guitarists, those centered around John Fahey.

The model par excellance, and the fountainhead, John virtually single-handedly created a style of solo guitar playing, as well as an audience to support it. He was also, for people like me, the inspiration to try making some kind of coherent music utilizing the acoustic guitar myself. Playing like the people who influence you, however, only gets you so far. No matter how much one loves a particular player, or how long one studies their work, it’s all but impossible to beat them at their own game. You’re always at a disadvantage. Better, therefore, to make up your own game, devise your own strategies, invent your own rules….

SHANNON HAYDEN
Shannon Hayden is a classically trained cellist who has never been content to stay strictly within the confines of the traditional course of study. Having achieved early success in competitions both at home and abroad she quickly began to experiment with other forms of music as well as other instruments. Working with renowned cellists such as Janos Starker and Aldo Parisot, with whom she began a graduate level course of study at the age of 18 at the Yale School of Music, did not keep her from playing lead guitar in rock and experimental bands or writing music for electric cello. She feels that musicians who want to consider themselves artists should go beyond mere craftsmanship and constantly look to expand the repertoire of their instrument, fulfilling the needs of the era within which they actively participate.

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